Data

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Africa & Middle East

The second annual TrustLaw Pro Bono Index came up with a number of positive findings from Africa and the Middle East. This year, 24 law firms from 18 countries across the region submitted data for the Index. Though representing only a slight increase from the 23 law firms that took part in 2014, submissions last year were received from only 15 regional jurisdictions. Lawyers in the region reported significantly higher levels of pro bono work and partner engagement appears to be on the rise.

The average pro bono hours per lawyer carried out across the region in the previous 12 months increased by nearly 50 percent to 30.4 hours in the 2015 Index from 20.5 hours in 2014. This jump may be due to high levels of pro bono reported by first-time Index participants in previously unrepresented countries such as Lebanon and Uganda. In addition, firms in a number of other countries, including Bahrain, Qatar, Saudi Arabia, and Mauritius, reported significant increases in pro bono engagement.

The average percentage of fee-earners undertaking 10 or more hours of pro bono per year increased to 42.7 percent from 33.6 percent. Partner engagement also rose with the average percentage of partners performing pro bono work increasing to 61 percent from 37 percent. In addition, the average hours of pro bono carried out on an individual basis almost doubled to 18.5 hours per partner from 9.6 hours.

These findings suggest a positive trend towards expanding pro bono across the region and growing interest among legal communities in countries without historical traditions of pro bono.

For a practitioner's view of pro bono in South Africa, please see here. For further insight into the pro bono sector in Ghana, please see here.

Please note, the regional tables have been ordered alphabetically.
Firm Name Country Average Hours per Fee-Earner Fee Earners with 10+ Hours of Pro Bono
Ashurst United Arab Emirates 3.06 11.76%
Badri & Salim El Meouchi Law Firm Qatar 60.00 100.00%
Badri & Salim El Meouchi Law Firm Lebanon 40.00 88.00%
Bowman Gilfillan Inc. Kenya 0.80 0%
Bowman Gilfillan Inc. South Africa 24.05 41.62%
Bowman Gilfillan Inc. Madagascar 16.57 35.71%
Bowman Gilfillan Inc. Uganda 26.32 52.63%
Dechert United Arab Emirates 23.27 93.33%
DLA Piper Bahrain 47.50 75.00%
DLA Piper Kuwait 74.71 100.00%
DLA Piper Qatar 39.00 66.67%
DLA Piper Saudi Arabia 30.72 61.11%
DLA Piper United Arab Emirates 25.03 49.23%
DLA Piper Oman 0 0%
Freshfields Bruckhaus Deringer LLP United Arab Emirates 3.22 -
Geni & Kebe Senegal 1.43 35.71%
Hogan Lovells South Africa South Africa 63.71 12.20%
K & L Gates LLP Qatar 9.90 10.00%
K & L Gates LLP United Arab Emirates 0 0%
Latham & Watkins LLP Saudi Arabia 13.13 25.00%
Latham & Watkins LLP United Arab Emirates 20.48 32.00%
Linklaters LLP United Arab Emirates 3.21 15.15%
Miranda Correia Amendoeira & Associados Angola 0.12 0%
Miranda Correia Amendoeira & Associados Mozambique 0.29 0%
Norton Rose Fulbright South Africa South Africa 37.85 77.98%
Reed Smith LLP United Arab Emirates 11.24 29.41%
Savjani & Co. Malawi 6.25 37.50%
Sharkawy & Sarhan Law Firm Egypt 65.00 12.50%
Shearman & Sterling LLP United Arab Emirates 2.09 9.52%
Simba & Simba Advocates Kenya 30.00 100.00%
Simmons & Simmons United Arab Emirates 8.62 -
Steptoe & Johnson Nigeria 20.00 60.00%
Udo Udoma & Belo-Osagie Nigeria 0.36 0%
Uteem Chambers Mauritius 142.86 71.43%
Webber Wentzel South Africa 30.99 16.38%
White & Case Qatar 13.86 42.86%
White & Case South Africa 30.05 42.11%
White & Case United Arab Emirates 7.85 25.93%

Qatar

Six law firms with offices in Qatar provided information on their pro bono initiatives for the 2015 Index, the same as in 2014, and four of these submitted detailed data on the quantity of pro bono work carried out by their lawyers in Qatar.

Among the most interesting findings is a marked increase in partner engagement. While all respondents in 2014 indicated that partners in Qatar performed no pro bono hours that year, this year’s results indicate that Qatar-based partners carried out an average of 17.6 pro bono hours in 2015. In addition, a number of indicators suggest the practice of pro bono is gaining ground in Qatar. For example, the average number of hours that lawyers dedicated to pro bono initiatives at respondent firms in Qatar jumped to 24.5 hours per fee-earner in 2015 from 10 hours in 2014. Further evidence of an expanding culture of pro bono among international firms in Qatar is the fact that 48 percent of all fee-earners dedicated some time to pro bono work in 2015, compared to only 13 percent the previous year.

In addition to international firms expanding their pro bono initiatives in the country, other members of the legal community have also taken actions to strengthen the culture of pro bono in Qatar. In Qatar the legal academic community has been largely responsible for promoting pro bono, which is seen as an important tool to give law students practical experience while instilling a strong public-service ethic and providing legal services to those in need. Qatari law schools have begun implementing pro bono programs similar to those found in countries with highly developed traditions of pro bono. In 2014, Qatar University joined the ranks of top universities in the United States, Canada, and Switzerland by establishing a Student Law Clinic, which provides pro bono legal advice on issues of international trade and investment.1

This year’s Index results suggest promising growth in the sector. Further analysis over coming years will show whether these findings illustrate a short-term anomaly or a sustainable, long-term trend.

1https://www.tradelab.org/clinics/qatar.html
Firm Name Average Hours per Fee-Earner Fee Earners with 10+ Hours of Pro Bono
Badri and Salim El Meouchi Law Firm 60.00 100.00%
DLA Piper 39.00 66.67%
White and Case 13.86 42.86%
K & L Gates LLP 9.90 10.00%

South Africa

The legal community in South Africa has established a strong culture of pro bono among its members, as illustrated by the Law Society of South Africa’s implementation of an annual 24-hour pro bono minimum requirement for all lawyers. However, pro bono advocates in South Africa are concerned this tradition may be threatened by legal regulatory reforms recently approved by the government. The Legal Practice Act 28 of 20141, in particular, may present a significant obstacle to further expansion of the country’s rapidly growing culture of pro bono. The law was enacted in February 2015 and reorganizes fundamental regulations governing the legal profession in South Africa. Although the changes will be implemented gradually over the next two years, many pro bono advocates fear it will further narrow the scope of the practice permitted under law and diminish the vibrant pro bono activities that have been a hallmark of South Africa’s legal culture in recent decades.

Data collected for the 2015 Index does not indicate significant shifts in pro bono engagement as a result of the regulatory reforms but data measuring the levels of pro bono output may not accurately reflect the impact for years. For the 2015 Index, the number of law firms from South Africa that participated was unchanged from 2014 with six firms providing data and information on their pro bono work. Lawyers in South Africa reported carrying out an average of 32.7 pro bono hours each over the previous 12 months, holding steady to the average reported in 2014.

Partner engagement seemed to have remained constant, with firms reporting that 38.5 percent of their partners contributed some pro bono hours over the past 12 months, a nominal decrease from the 40.5 percent reported in 2014. Across the country, partners performed on average 14.8 hours of pro bono services, an increase from last year’s reported 13.9 hours.

Last year’s results provided evidence of South African firms’ highly developed pro bono infrastructures relative to other countries in the region, and data submitted in 2015 suggests this continues to characterise pro bono programmes in South Africa. All respondent firms have a designated pro bono coordinator and implement utilisation targets to encourage internal pro bono engagement. In 2014, all but one firm included access to justice in their list of priority issues. Interestingly, economic development and anti-corruption issues appeared more prominently among respondents’ key interest areas in 2015, while access to justice was not prioritised by any of this year’s respondent firms.

For a practitioner's view of pro bono in South Africa, please see here.

1http://www.lssa.org.za/upload/Legal%20Practice%20Act%20GG%2038022%20of%2022%20September%202014.pdf
Firm Name Average Hours per Fee-Earner Fee Earners with 10+ Hours of Pro Bono
Hogan Lovells South Africa 63.71 12.20%
Norton Rose Fulbright South Africa 37.85 77.98%
Webber Wentzel 30.99 16.38%
White & Case 30.05 42.11%
Bowman Gilfillan Inc. 24.05 41.62%

United Arab Emirates

Recent legislative developments in the United Arab Emirates represent a positive shift in the regulatory environment which may help to address legal barriers to pro bono and enable more lawyers to engage in legal aid projects in the future. The most notable change was the revision to Part 38 of the Rules of the DIFC Court (RDC) in April 2014, which allows pro bono litigants to be granted a cost-free trial in certain circumstances and may serve to increase access to justice.1

The UAE has been a leader in the Middle East with regards to government promotion of pro bono legal assistance. In 2012, the DIFC (Dubai International Finance Centre), which establishes legal regulations relating to trade and finance in the UAE, created a Pro Bono Clinic Initiative within its broader Pro Bono Programme, which was founded in 2009 and represented the first of its kind in the region.2 Recent legal developments and analysis of the data submitted to the 2015 Index indicate a gradual trend towards stronger pro bono activity in the UAE, although the slow pace of change reflected in data collected over the past two years demands caution in presuming the long-term sustainability of a positive trend toward the expansion of pro bono in the Emirates.

Index submissions were received from 19 firms with offices in the UAE, 11 of which provided data detailing their firms’ pro bono activities. This compared to nine data submissions received in 2014. Although the average number of pro bono hours carried out per lawyer decreased by more than 30% on the previous year, to 11.4 hours from 16.7 hours, the percentage of lawyers doing any pro bono increased to 33.4 percent from 23.7 percent. These findings suggest that although individual lawyers may be taking on fewer hours of pro bono than in previous years, interest and awareness of pro bono opportunities is more broadly shared among a greater number of lawyers within the respondent firms.

Partner engagement remained steady over the past year, with partners performing an average of 6.3 hours of pro bono each. Similarly, the percentage of partners that performed any pro bono work continued to hover around 25 percent.

1http://difccourts.ae/rules-2/part-38/
2http://difccourts.ae/pro-bono/
Firm Name Average Hours per Fee-Earner Fee Earners with 10+ Hours of Pro Bono
Dechert 58.53 93.33%
DLA Piper 25.03 49.23%
Latham & Watkins LLP 20.48 32.00%
Reed Smith LLP 11.24 29.41%
Simmons & Simmons 8.62 -
White & Case 7.85 25.93%
Freshfields Bruckhaus Deringer LLP 3.22 -
Linklaters LLP 3.21 15.15%
Ashurst 3.06 11.76%
Shearman & Sterling LLP 2.09 9.52%
K & L Gates LLP 0 0%

Americas

The 2015 Index received data from 34 offices in 10 countries across the Americas, not including the United States, which was an increase of nearly 50 percent from last year’s participation by 23 offices in as many countries. Increased data has provided a sharper picture of the pro bono work happening across the region and the future looks bright.

The average hours of pro bono performed by fee-earners was 14.6, slightly higher than last year’s average of 11.2 hours. Across the region, 46.7 percent of lawyers performed 10 or more hours of pro bono over the last 12 months, an increase of 76% over last year. A total of 39.7 percent of partners across the region worked on pro bono matters, representing a favourable increase from the 34.4 percent reported in 2014. However, the average hours that partners dedicated to pro bono work dropped from 15.0 hours in 2014 to 13.8 hours this year.

While other surveys of the region have reported low partner participation across Latin America, including the latest from the Vance Center, that was not true for our survey. Looking at just responses from South and Central America, we saw an average of 37.4 percent of partners engaging in some pro bono work, with partners performing an average of 14.8 hours of pro bono each over the past 12 months. These findings reveal a small annual increase in partner participation across the region from the 34.4 percent reported in 2014.

For the purposes of the Index, data from across the Americas has been grouped together, though excluding the United States. Data was received from 10 countries in the Americas: Argentina, Bolivia, Brazil, Canada, Chile, Colombia, Mexico, Panama, Peru, and Venezuela.

For a practitioner's view of pro bono in Colombia, please see here.

Please note, the regional data tables have been ordered alphabetically.
Firm Name Country Average Hours per Fee-Earner Fee Earners with 10+ Hours of Pro Bono
Allende & Brea Abogados Argentina 4.36 8.06%
Barros & Errázuriz Abogados Chile 17.00 65.00%
Basham Ringe & Correa S.C. Mexico 7.67 -
Blake, Cassels & Graydon LLP Canada 15.88 27.23%
Bullo Tassi Estebenet Lipera Torassa Abogados Argentina 28.16 71.43%
Cariola Diez Perez-Cotapos & Cia. Ltda. Chile 6.32 17.89%
Cavelier Abogados Colombia 32.50 53.57%
Creel, Garcia-Cuellar, Aiza & Enriquez, S.C. Mexico 4.15 12.31%
Estudio Beccar Varela Argentina 14.55 36.36%
Garcia Sayan Abogados Peru 7.44 27.78%
Gomez Pinzon Zuleta Colombia 32.72 74.07%
Guevara & Gutierrez S.C. Bolivia 7.86 28.57%
Hogan Lovells Brazil 5.30 20.00%
Hogan Lovells Mexico 28.26 62.67%
Hogan Lovells Venezuela 29.25 87.50%
Holland & Knight LLP Colombia 4.09 -
Holland & Knight LLP Mexico 0.87 -
Koury Lopes Advogados (KLA) Brazil 2.66 2.22%
Lima & Asociados Consultores S.A. Bolivia 8.40 20.00%
Marval, O'Farrell & Mairal Argentina 20.41 33.20%
Mattos Filho, Veiga Filho, Marrey Jr. & Quiroga Advogados Brazil 8.45 14.81%
McCarthy Tetrault LLP Canada 13.96 28.26%
Morgan & Morgan Panama 23.12 44.16%
Osler, Hoskin & Harcourt LLP Canada 14.83 71.97%
Perez Alati, Grondona, Benites, Arntsen & Martinez de Hoz (h) Argentina 17.98 29.71%
Sanchez DeVanny Eseverri, S.C. Mexico 4.41 22.06%
Shearman & Sterling LLP Brazil 0 0%
Shearman & Sterling LLP Canada 13.64 44.44%
Skadden, Arps, Slate, Meagher & Flom LLP Brazil 0 0%
Skadden, Arps, Slate, Meagher & Flom LLP Canada 2.60 10.00%
Tufiño & Villegas Bolivia 198.75 100.00%
Veirano Advogados Brazil 30.00 25.00%
Von Wobeser & Sierra, S.C. Mexico 30.00 -
White & Case Brazil 32.20 40.00%
White & Case Mexico 19.91 51.43%
Zapiola Guerrico & Asociados Argentina 27.78 22.22%

Argentina

Pro bono work in Argentina appears to be increasing based on the findings of the 2015 Index. Index participation held steady from 2014, with six firms providing submissions this year, all of which were domestic firms. On average the lawyers at those firms performed 20.8 hours per fee-earner, up 30 percent from the 2014 data. This was above the regional average of 14.6 hours. Participation remained high with 41.5 percent of lawyers performing 10 or more hours of pro bono, down from 43.8 percent last year.

Partners at the Argentine firms in the survey performed on average 12.2 hours of pro bono, a slight decrease from last year. In addition, 36.3 percent of partners participated in at least one pro bono matter over the last 12 months, also a small decrease from last year’s 41.2 percent.

Although there is no formal requirement in place for lawyers to perform a minimum amount of pro bono, more than 80 percent of domestic respondent firms have a requirement in place for their lawyers to do a minimum amount of pro bono. We can assume some of these have been put in place in the last 12 months.

All of the respondent firms have some pro bono infrastructure in place. Almost all have a designated pro bono coordinator and half have a pro bono committee. Half of the respondent firms include pro bono in compensation decisions.

No strong trends emerge regarding the types of organisations or the fields pro bono clients work in although, interestingly, many of the respondent firms share a commitment to supporting disability rights. All firms support registered charities and non-profits with their pro bono and most also conduct public interest litigation. Only one performs pro bono for social enterprises. It is possible that recent initiatives that aim to promote the B Corporation model for social businesses – which originated in the United States – through the Sistema B en Sudamerica initiative may impact this number in future years.1

1http://abogados.com.ar/nuevas-tendencias-en-trabajo-pro-bono/15761
Firm Name Average Hours per Fee-Earner Fee Earners with 10+ Hours of Pro Bono
Bullo Tassi Estebenet Lipera Torassa Abogados 28.16 71.43%
Zapiola Guerrico & Asociados 27.78 22.22%
Marval, O'Farrell & Mairal 20.41 33.20%
Perez Alati, Grondona, Benites, Arntsen & Martinez de Hoz (h) 17.98 29.71%
Estudio Beccar Varela 14.55 36.36%
Allende & Brea Abogados 4.36 8.06%

Brazil

Brazil changed long-standing regulations prohibiting private lawyers to provide free legal counsel in July 2013. This spurred a flurry of activity on behalf of pro bono organizations and corporate supporters in 2014 to raise awareness of pro bono among Brazil’s legal community.1

Seven firms with offices in Brazil submitted data for the 2015 Index, a slight increase from the five firms that participated in 2014. This included data from both domestic firms and local offices of international firms. Foreign lawyers and non-Brazilian law firms are not allowed to practice Brazilian law so international firms only offer advice on non-Brazilian matters.

Lawyers in Brazil on average performed 7.9 hours of pro bono over the past year against 6.2 hours last year though there was a wide range in the data, from 32.2 hours to none. The percentage of lawyers doing 10 or more hours of pro bono was 13.1 percent, up 1.5 percentage points from the 11.6 average hours reported last year. Partners in Brazil performed 5.1 hours of pro bono on average, compared to 13.6 hours last year, with one quarter engaging in at least one pro bono matter. These numbers paints a relatively positive picture of pro bono in the region, as generally our data shows both fee-earner participation levels and average hours per fee-earner have increased.

Given the restrictive laws across much of Brazil, it is interesting to note that all the respondent firms in Brazil have pro bono coordinators. Half of the firms in the Index have set targets for pro bono and half also include pro bono in compensation decisions.

None of the domestic firms that responded to the Index will do pro bono work for social enterprises despite the rapid expansion of those organisations in the country. They also support a range of sectors including women’s rights and economic development.

1DLA Lawyers Promote Pro Bono Work in Brazil, 27 March 2014, http://www.nationallawjournal.com/legaltimes/id=1202648622758/DLA-Lawyers-Promote-Pro-Bono-Work-in-Brazil?slreturn=20150213105316
Firm Name Average Hours per Fee-Earner Fee Earners with 10+ Hours of Pro Bono
White & Case 32.20 40.00%
Veirano Advogados 30.00 25.00%
Mattos Filho, Veiga Filho, Marrey Jr. & Quiroga Advogados 8.45 14.81%
Hogan Lovells 5.30 20.00%
Koury Lopes Advogados (KLA) 2.66 2.22%
Shearman & Sterling LLP 0 0%
Skadden, Arps, Slate, Meagher & Flom LLP 0 0%

Canada

Canadian lawyers have worked for years to promote access to justice through legal aid and pro bono work. Traditionally, this has happened at a provincial level with limited efforts to coordinate nationally. In recent years, however, this has changed. With the founding of Pro Bono Canada in 2012 and their first annual conference last September, pro bono in Canada is becoming more organised on a national scale.

Five Canadian firms responded to the Index in 2015 compared to one respondent last year, and this provided enough data for a full country analysis. The firms in Canada reported that their lawyers on average performed 14.8 hours of pro bono. Over one third of fee-earners, or 36.3 percent, at participating firms undertook 10 or more hours of pro bono in the last year.

Partner participation was similar to other large jurisdictions in the Americas with 26.9 percent of partners spending time on pro bono and an average of five hours per partner.

The pro bono infrastructure at the respondent firms was relatively sophisticated. All of them had a pro bono committee, and four of the five had assigned a pro bono coordinator. While four of the firms factored pro bono into compensation discussions, only two firms had targets for pro bono.
Firm Name Average Hours per Fee-Earner Fee Earners with 10+ Hours of Pro Bono
Blake, Cassels & Graydon LLP 15.88 27.27%
Osler, Hoskin & Harcourt LLP 14.83 71.97%
McCarthy Tétrault LLP 13.96 28.26%
Shearman & Sterling LLP 13.64 44.44%
Skadden, Arps, Slate, Meagher and Flom LLP 2.60 10.00%

Mexico

As Mexico continues to build its pro bono culture, new developments are aiming to expand the work already being done in large part by the non-profit sector and university law clinics.

Pro bono supporters in Mexico and professional organizations such as ANADE (La Asociacion Nacional de Abogados de Empresa) are taking part in efforts to expand corporate in-house pro bono participation through a number of events aimed at engaging corporate legal teams in pro bono initiatives.1 Additionally, proposed legislative changes may help to enhance Mexico’s pro bono landscape in the near future. A bill was proposed in 2014 that would make pro bono work mandatory for certain professions, including lawyers.2

The 2015 Index saw an increase in the data received from Mexico with seven firms reporting their pro bono involvement, up from four last year. With more data our results are painting what is perhaps a more accurate picture of the emerging pro bono culture in the country. Respondents reported on average 12.4 hours per fee-earner over the past year, a decrease from 23.1 hours last year. Roughly 33 percent of fee-earners undertook 10 or more hours of pro bono compared to the 50.5 percent reported in 2014. Partner engagement was on par with the other countries in the region with 35 percent of partners engaging in pro bono work for an average of 11.4 hours per partner. Analysis of data submitted in 2014 showed that 48.6 percent of partners contributed some time to pro bono projects over the previous 12 months, and individual partners at respondent firms in Mexico performed an average of 25.8 hours of qualifying pro bono over the same period.

Pro bono infrastructure at the Mexican firms was sophisticated. All reported having pro bono coordinators and nearly all have targets. Half of the firms factor pro bono work into compensation.

1http://www.acc.com/accdocket/onlineexclusives/anade-mexico.cfm
2http://www.vancecenter.org/vancecenter/images/stories/vancecenter/pro%20bono%20survey%202014.pdf
Firm Name Average Hours per Fee-Earner Fee Earners with 10+ Hours of Pro Bono
Von Wobeser & Sierra, S.C. 30.00 -
Hogan Lovells 28.26 62.67%
White & Case 19.91 51.43%
Basham Ringe & Correa, S.C. 7.67 -
Sanchez DeVanny Eseverri, S.C. 4.41 22.06%
Creel, Garcia-Cuellar, Aiza & Enriquez, S.C. 4.15 12.31%
Holland & Knight LLP 0.87 -

Asia & Pacific

Unprecedented rates of economic development in countries across Asia and the Pacific have encouraged a number of large international law firms to establish offices in the region, helping to spread awareness and interest in pro bono within legal communities that previously lacked such traditions.1 International organisations such as the United Nations and the International Bar Association have also played a significant role in spreading the practice of pro bono across the region through partnerships with local non-government organisations and support for events such as the Asia Pro Bono Conference, which is now in its fourth year.

A total of 46 law firms in 17 countries in Asia and the Pacific provided data on their pro bono operations for the 2015 Index, a marked increase from the 31 law firms that submitted data from 15 regional jurisdictions in 2014. Lawyers performed a median average of 17.3 hours of pro bono each over the previous 12 months, a slight increase from 15.9 hours in 2014. The median percentage of lawyers carrying out 10 or more hours of pro bono across the 17 regional jurisdictions increased to 38.8 percent this year from 30 percent in 2014. Analysis of 2015 submissions indicates lawyers in South Korea performed the highest levels of pro bono by far, averaging 62.5 hours per fee-earner.

Data covering the past 12 months suggests that levels of partner engagement have increased from the previous year. The median average hours that partners dedicated to pro bono increased to 12.6 hours from 10.5 hours in the 2014 survey. Across the region, the median percentage of partners dedicating any time to pro bono matters increased to 49 percent from 35.6 percent. Despite these positive regional trends, Asia and the Pacific continue to have the lowest percentage of partners engaging in pro bono work among all six regions.

A comparative analysis of data from Asia and the Pacific across the past two years indicates that although levels of pro bono continue to lag behind other regions with stronger traditions of pro bono, the trends appear to suggest a gradual strengthening of pro bono cultures in the 17 countries in Asia and the Pacific. Data indicating higher employee and partner engagement are evidence of this trend.

For a practitioner's view of pro bono in Cambodia, please see here.

1http://thepbeye.probonoinst.org/2012/12/11/pbis-got-seoul/

Please note, the regional data tables have been ordered alphabetically.
Firm Name Country Average Hours per Fee-Earner Fee Earners with 10+ Hours of Pro Bono
Adnan Kelana Haryanto & Hermanto Indonesia 54.57 64.29%
Ahmed & Qazi Advocates & Legal Consultants Pakistan 0.80 3.33%
ALMT Legal India 0 0%
Ashurst Hong Kong 1.92 6.25%
Ashurst Indonesia 3.27 7.69%
Atsumi & Sakai Japan 0.80 0%
AZB & Partners India 3.00 5.00%
Azmi & Associates Singapore 0 0%
Azmi & Associates Malaysia 37.71 68.57%
Bae, Kim & Lee LLC South Korea 63.17 41.75%
Chowdhury & Ullah Bangladesh 28.00 100.00%
Chowdhury & Ullah India 0.00 -
Chowdhury & Ullah Sri Lanka 28.00 100.00%
Colin Ng & Partners LLP Singapore 0.70 2.17%
Debevoise & Plimpton LLP Hong Kong 25.94 20.00%
Dechert China 20.33 66.67%
Dechert Hong Kong 28.59 76.47%
Dechert Kazakhstan 40.75 75.00%
Dechert Singapore 0 0%
DLA Piper China 48.83 20.00%
DLA Piper Hong Kong 16.78 19.85%
DLA Piper Japan 34.29 33.33%
DLA Piper Singapore 8.50 16.67%
DLA Piper South Korea 36.50 50.00%
DLA Piper Thailand 18.72 31.91%
Drew & Napier LLC Singapore 1.07 3.56%
Faegre Baker Daniels LLP China 0.33 0%
Frasers Law Company Vietnam 13.00 20.00%
Freshfields Bruckhaus Deringer LLP China 2.87 -
Freshfields Bruckhaus Deringer LLP Hong Kong 23.08 -
Freshfields Bruckhaus Deringer LLP Japan 11.25 -
Freshfields Bruckhaus Deringer LLP Singapore 4.98 -
Freshfields Bruckhaus Deringer LLP Vietnam 4.98 -
Goodwin Procter LLP Hong Kong 4.78 22.22%
Grünkorn & Partner Law Co., Ltd Vietnam 3.57 -
JunZeJun Law Offices China 5.06 15.38%
K & L Gates LLP China 14.92 25.00%
K & L Gates LLP Hong Kong 17.19 25.93%
K & L Gates LLP Japan 5.95 10.53%
K & L Gates LLP Singapore 0.53 0%
K & L Gates LLP Taiwan 17.20 20.00%
Kirkland & Ellis LLP China 0.03 0%
Kirkland & Ellis LLP Hong Kong 0.37 1.67%
Latham & Watkins LLP China 12.20 40.00%
Latham & Watkins LLP Hong Kong 46.51 45.10%
Latham & Watkins LLP Japan 11.08 30.77%
Latham & Watkins LLP Singapore 8.69 27.78%
LawQuest India 13.63 75.00%
Lee & Li, Attorneys at Law Taiwan 0.25 0.69%
Leks & Co Indonesia 18.18 -
Linklaters LLP Hong Kong 4.84 13.53%
McDermott Will & Emery LLP China 10.80 22.86%
MNK Law Offices India 6.00 14.29%
Morrison & Foerster LLP China 22.67 50.00%
Morrison & Foerster LLP Hong Kong 5.82 18.42%
Morrison & Foerster LLP Japan 33.83 36.28%
Morrison & Foerster LLP Singapore 0.50 0%
Orrick, Herrington & Sutcliffe LLP China 45.05 43.14%
Orrick, Herrington & Sutcliffe LLP Japan 50.68 48.15%
Paul Hastings China 53.40 100.00%
Paul Hastings Hong Kong 24.49 71.43%
Paul Hastings Japan 30.29 57.14%
Paul Hastings South Korea 32.13 100.00%
Pradhan & Associates Nepal 2.00 20.00%
Prime Law Associates Nepal 3.06 100.00%
Puyat Jacinto & Santos (PJSLaw) Philippines 3.00 16.67%
Reed Smith LLP China 1.95 5.26%
Reed Smith LLP Hong Kong 1.38 4.21%
Reed Smith LLP Singapore 3.92 8.33%
Ropes & Gray LLP China 0.08 0.00%
Ropes & Gray LLP Hong Kong 13.94 14.29%
Ropes & Gray LLP Japan 12.36 18.18%
Ropes & Gray LLP South Korea 0.00 0.00%
Shearman & Sterling LLP China 4.57 8.70%
Shearman & Sterling LLP Hong Kong 1.13 6.52%
Shearman & Sterling LLP Japan 11.50 29.41%
Shearman & Sterling LLP Singapore 19.09 19.05%
Simmons & Simmons China 18.32 -
Simmons & Simmons Singapore 8.70 -
Simpson Grierson New Zealand 7.80 12.44%
Skadden, Arps, Slate, Meagher & Flom LLP China 0.20 0%
Skadden, Arps, Slate, Meagher & Flom LLP Hong Kong 33.30 35.09%
Skadden, Arps, Slate, Meagher & Flom LLP Japan 17.50 60.00%
Skadden, Arps, Slate, Meagher & Flom LLP Singapore 14.83 16.67%
Skadden, Arps, Slate, Meagher & Flom LLP South Korea 0 0%
Thanathip & Partners Legal Counselors Limited Thailand 15.00 100.00%
UKCA & Partners India 7.50 15.00%
Weil, Gotshal & Manges LLP China 0.50 0%
Weil, Gotshal & Manges LLP Hong Kong 5.50 5.00%
White & Case China 6.61 18.42%
White & Case Hong Kong 9.26 32.26%
White & Case Japan 18.47 31.82%
White & Case Kazakhstan 22.38 62.50%
White & Case Singapore 20.54 51.43%
White & Case Indonesia 123.50 100.00%
Winston & Strawn LLP Hong Kong 20.22 38.89%

China

As China’s pro bono culture continues to develop, debates within the legal community in recent years have centred on identifying the most effective methods for ensuring access to justice, with pro bono supporters arguing that this requires multiple approaches including government legal aid, non-government organisation (NGO) advocacy, and pro bono assistance from private law firms.1 Although international law firms continue efforts to expand their pro bono work in China, local firms have not yet begun engaging in pro bono on a large scale. As in 2014, this year’s Index found only one domestic Chinese firm was among the 18 respondents that submitted data on pro bono work.

The lack of pro bono engagement by domestic firms is due partly to the fact that a strong pro bono culture has not traditionally existed within the Chinese legal community. In addition, some Chinese lawyers argue that the Ministry of Justice assigns an excessive number of legal aid tasks to local law firms, diminishing the resources and capacity of domestic firms to take on voluntary pro bono work. There are currently three pieces of national legislation restricting the activities of non-profit organizations, including the Regulations on Registration Administration of Associations (1998), Interim Regulations on the Administration of the Registration of Privately Owned Non-Enterprise Organizations (1998) and Regulations on Administration of Foundations (2004). There are also many relevant local regulations, the implementation of which varies across provinces.

This patchwork of complex and outdated laws makes it extremely difficult for many NGOs to establish methods of compliance that satisfy the many layers of legal provisions regulating their operations. They also struggle to access professional legal advice to ensure their practices do not inadvertently stray outside the bounds of the law. These challenges help explain why China’s NGO sector remains less developed than in other regional jurisdictions and why the pro bono market continues to be quite small.

Recent government action, however, suggests a growing awareness among the political class of the need to keep pace with international trends in the development sector. Currently the National People’s Congress, China’s legislative body, is drafting new laws to regulate charities and NGOs. Many welcome these reforms, hoping updated legislation will help to clarify existing law, while others worry the reforms will impose greater restrictions on the activities of NGOs. So far few details have been released regarding the content of impending legislative changes so it remains difficult to gauge the potential impact of such reforms on China’s pro bono market.

Analysis of data from 19 firms with offices in China suggests positive growth in the country’s pro bono market. Lawyers performed an average of 19.2 hours of pro bono each, an increase of nearly 28 percent on the previous year and above the regional median average of 17.3 hours per fee-earner. The percentage of lawyers performing 10 or more hours of pro bono remained steady, nudging up to 24.8 percent from 21.2 percent of lawyers at respondent firms.

China showed strong levels of partner engagement compared to other countries in the region, with partners completing on average 24.4 hours of pro bono over the past 12 months compared to 13.7 hours last year and a 2015 regional average of 14 hours. In addition, 37.3 percent of partners at respondent firms contributed some pro bono hours, a notable increase from the 16.7 percent reported last year.

1http://www.pilnet.org/events/186-three-ways-are-better-than-one-building-public-interest-law-in-china.html
Firm Name Average Hours per Fee-Earner Fee Earners with 10+ Hours of Pro Bono
Paul Hastings 53.40 100.00%
DLA Piper 48.83 20.00%
Orrick, Herrington & Sutcliffe LLP 45.05 43.14%
Morrison & Foerster 22.67 50.00%
Dechert 20.33 66.67%
Simmons & Simmons 18.32 -
K & L Gates LLP 14.92 25.00%
Latham & Watkins LLP 12.20 40.00%
McDermott Will & Emery LLP 10.80 22.86%
White & Case 6.61 18.42%
JunZeJun Law Offices 5.06 15.38%
Shearman & Sterling LLP 4.57 8.70%
Freshfields Bruckhaus Deringer LLP 2.87 -
Reed Smith LLP 1.95 5.26%
Weil, Gotshal & Manges LLP 0.50 0%
Faegre Baker Daniels LLP 0.33 0%
Skadden, Arps, Slate, Meagher & Flom LLP 0.20 0%
Ropes & Gray LLP 0.08 0.00%
Kirkland & Ellis LLP 0.03 0%

Hong Kong

Hong Kong’s pro bono marketplace has grown substantially in recent years despite regulatory challenges that have occasionally presented obstacles to broader acceptance of the practice. Rapid growth in the non-government organisation and social enterprise sectors has heightened demand for pro bono services but proponents still struggle to engage the legal community and gain support from law firms. Recent trends, however, indicate positive developments in favour of further institutionalizing pro bono and incorporating it into the legal culture in Hong Kong.1

In addition, an increase in pro-democracy activism in 2014 has inspired some in the legal community to volunteer their services. Following reported police abuse against protesters in democracy protests in August 2014, a number of lawyers volunteered pro bono advice to demonstrators. The willingness to offer assistance in such circumstances shows a desire from lawyers to use their professional expertise to advance social causes they believe in.2

One of the challenges facing local lawyers who wish to work on pro bono projects in Hong Kong is a regulation limiting access to indemnity insurance, which can only be taken out by law firms and is not available to individual lawyers. As foreign lawyers are prohibited from practicing law in Hong Kong, the jurisdiction’s burgeoning NGO sector is often left with few options for accessing affordable legal services.3

Analysis of data submitted by 19 participating firms in 2015 indicates that lawyers in Hong Kong performed on average 13.6 hours of pro bono each over the past 12 months, slightly below the regional average of 17.3 hours but up from 10.9 hours last year.

This year, 16.9 percent of partners at 13 Hong Kong respondent firms reported contributing some time to pro bono work over the previous 12-month period, down from 27.4 percent of partners that engaged in 2014. This change, however, may be explained by more firms providing partner data with 13 giving this information in 2015 compared to seven in 2014.

1http://www.scmp.com/comment/insight-opinion/article/1517880/pro-bono-legal-work-can-help-advance-social-justice-hong
2http://www.wsj.com/articles/hong-kong-lawyers-to-offer-pro-bono-aid-to-pro-democracy-protesters-1409224036
3http://www.scmp.com/news/hong-kong/article/1519480/pro-bono-legal-help-levels-playing-field-hong-kong-ngos
Firm Name Average Hours per Fee-Earner Fee Earners with 10+ Hours of Pro Bono
Latham & Watkins LLP 46.51 45.10%
Skadden, Arps, Slate, Meagher & Flom LLP 33.30 35.09%
Dechert 28.59 76.47%
Debevoise & Plimpton LLP 25.94 20.00%
Paul Hastings 24.49 71.43%
Freshfields Bruckhaus Deringer LLP 23.08 -
Winston & Strawn LLP 20.22 38.89%
K & L Gates LLP 17.19 25.93%
DLA Piper 16.78 19.85%
Ropes & Gray LLP 13.94 14.29%
White & Case 9.26 32.26%
Morrison & Foerster LLP 5.82 18.42%
Weil, Gotshal & Manges LLP 5.50 5.00%
Linklaters LLP 4.84 13.53%
Goodwin Procter LLP 4.78 22.22%
Ashurst 1.92 6.25%
Reed Smith LLP 1.38 4.21%
Shearman & Sterling LLP 1.13 6.52%
Kirkland & Ellis LLP 0.37 1.67%

India

Pro bono supporters have continued ongoing efforts to spread pro bono in India over the past year by holding information events and workshops to increase awareness and generate support among key stakeholders. In addition, India’s pro bono legal landscape garnered international attention in 2014 when “Forbes India” recognized the pro bono work of five women lawyers in its “30 Under 30” list1, indicating the popularity of pro bono among young lawyers in India and fuelling optimism for the further expansion of pro bono within India’s legal community.

Despite these positive developments, and strong support for pro bono among influential proponents such as Ashoka and i-Probono, this year’s Index found a notable decrease in India’s level of pro bono engagement across all key indicators. This discrepancy, however, may illustrate a short-term anomaly in which the measurable impact of recent developments intended to strengthen pro bono is simply lagging the efforts themselves. Close analysis of the data over coming years will contribute to a better understanding of the impact that ongoing advocacy efforts have had on the long-term development of the pro bono sector in India.

In addition, while the Index received responses from seven firms in India this year – one more than participated in 2014, only two firms participated both years. This suggests that the dramatic drop in pro bono participation illustrated by a comparative analysis of data submitted in 2015 and 2014 does not necessarily reflect a significant year-on-year decrease in pro bono engagement by individual firms but may simply be a result of the fact that four of the six respondent firms in 2015 did not participate in last year’s Index. Thus, the respondent pools for 2014 and 2015 are largely comprised of different law firms, limiting the conclusions that can be reasonably drawn from comparing the data across years.

As international law firms are not permitted to operate in India, all Index submissions from India were provided by domestic law firms. Data from the six participating firms this year show that lawyers in India performed significantly less pro bono work than in 2014. Fee-earners averaged 2.7 hours each over the past 12 months, a drop of nearly 50 percent on the previous year’s findings of 5.3 hours. Similarly, the percentage of lawyers doing 10 or more hours of pro bono dropped to 5.3 percent from 15.2 percent.

Data indicates that levels of partner engagement were also down. Although the percentage of partners engaged in pro bono held steady at about 33 percent, the average hours per partner fell nearly 60 percent to 1.8 hours from 4.7 hours in 2014. Partner engagement in India is markedly lower than in other countries in the region where the number of pro bono hours performed by partners over the past 12 months averaged 13.4 hours.

About half of respondent firms factored pro bono work into determining lawyer compensation, and two thirds employ a designated pro bono coordinator.

1http://forbesindia.com/firstprinciples/specialreport/30-under-30/1449/1
Firm Name Average Hours per Fee-Earner Fee Earners with 10+ Hours of Pro Bono
LawQuest 13.63 75.00%
UKCA and Partners 7.50 15.00%
MNK Law Offices 6.00 14.29%
AZB & Partners 3.00 5.00%
KIAA, LLP 0.67 -
ALMT Legal 0 0%
Chowdhury & Ullah 0 -

Indonesia

Indonesia has been progressively strengthening its democratic infrastructure since emerging from authoritarian rule in the late 1990s and this has included developing the complex legal institutions necessary to ensure justice and equality in a modern democracy.

Foreign lawyers are not allowed to practice Indonesian law or establish branches of foreign law firms in Indonesia, limiting the ability of international law firms to influence the growth of pro bono to the same extent as in other developing legal systems, such as South Korea. The Indonesian Advocates Association (Perhimpunan Advokat Indonesia, or PERADI) formed a Legal Aid Centre in 2009 to increase access to justice by providing free legal assistance to those in need. This move was intended to ensure fulfilment of the Indonesian Constitution, which guarantees the right to equality before the law. The Centre has worked in partnership with international groups such as the International Organization for Migration (IOM) to combat human rights abuses, including an initiative that provides free legal assistance and representation to victims of human trafficking.

Although the government does not directly provide free legal aid, the Indonesian Parliament passed the Legal Aid Law in 2011, which established a unique legal aid system in which independent non-profit organizations receive reimbursement from the state for providing legal aid services to those in need, defined as underprivileged individuals, involved in civil, criminal, or administrative procedure and non-litigation matters.

This year saw a notable increase in Index participation from Indonesia. Eight law firms with offices in Indonesia provided details of their pro bono structures, compared to two last year, and half of those submitted comprehensive data detailing pro bono initiatives. The four firms that submitted data represent 71 lawyers who completed an average of 36 hours of pro bono over the past 12 months. Only one firm submitted data on pro bono work in Indonesia last year so it is difficult to compare this year’s data to the 2014 Index. The fact so many more firms participated in the 2015 Index could suggest that interest in pro bono work is spreading in the legal community in Indonesia.

Fourteen partners across the four respondent firms performed on average 14.8 hours of pro bono. The majority of partners, or 57.1 percent, contributed some time to pro bono in the past year. This data suggests although Indonesia’s pro bono culture remains nascent, there is partner engagement.
Firm Name Average Hours per Fee-Earner Fee Earners with 10+ Hours of Pro Bono
White & Case 123.50 100.00%
Adnan Kelana Haryanto & Hermanto 54.57 64.29%
Leks & Co 18.18 -
Ashurst 3.27 7.69%

Japan

Japan has a comprehensive legal aid framework that receives funding and support from the government and local bar associations. Free or discounted legal advice is available to both citizens and foreigners who cannot afford legal assistance or who meet a number of specific means-tested criteria.1 Historically these services have proved sufficient to ensure legal representation and fill legal aid gaps without the need to develop an extensive pro bono culture within private law firms.

A number of trends, however, may be gradually increasing the demand for pro bono legal services. A growing elderly population is straining the country’s social security system and motivating the government to look for cheaper alternatives to provide social services. Often NGOs, local community organisations, and non-profit organisations step in to fill these service gaps. These organizations may become a source of growing demand for pro bono work in the future. In addition, Japan’s strict immigration laws and increasing labour migration have resulted in greater demand for free legal assistance to individuals in the complex immigration system.2

Finally, the growth of the NGO sector has been accompanied by a parallel growth in social entrepreneurship across Japan as the business community seeks sustainable economic growth that will provide a path to prosperity for Japanese society while preserving the country’s scarce natural resources and long history of responsible social and cultural stewardship.

Twelve firms with offices in Japan submitted data for this year’s Index, compared to eight in 2014. Subsequent analysis shows that lawyers in Japan completed on average 21.9 hours of pro bono each over the past 12 months which is higher than the regional median average of 17.3 hours and a slight increase on the 19.5 hours reported in 2014 by respondent firms in Japan.

This year 10 firms submitted data on their partners’ pro bono participation, an increase from the nine that participated in 2014. In addition the Index saw a domestic firm participate for the first time. Although levels of partner engagement reported in 2015 by firms with offices in Japan decreased by more than 10 percentage points to 26.2 percent from 37.8 percent in 2014, findings indicate that law firms in Japan still maintain higher levels of partner engagement than their counterparts in similarly developed pro bono markets such as Singapore and Hong Kong.

1http://www.japantimes.co.jp/community/2014/05/04/how-tos/cut-keep-guide-getting-legal-advice-japan/#.VUNaiPldV8E
2https://www.refugee.or.jp/jar/release/2015/01/19-0001.shtml
Firm Name Average Hours per Fee-Earner Fee Earners with 10+ Hours of Pro Bono
Orrick, Herrington & Sutcliffe LLP 50.68 48.15%
DLA Piper 34.29 33.33%
Morrison & Foerster LLP 33.83 36.28%
Paul Hastings 30.29 57.14%
White & Case 18.47 31.82%
Skadden, Arps, Slate, Meagher & Flom LLP 17.50 60.00%
Ropes & Gray LLP 12.36 18.18%
Shearman & Sterling LLP 11.50 29.41%
Freshfields Bruckhaus Deringer LLP 11.25 -
Latham & Watkins LLP 11.08 30.77%
K & L Gates LLP 5.95 10.53%
Atsumi & Sakai 0.80 0%

Singapore

The Council of the Law Society of Singapore enacted reforms to the Legal Profession Act in March this year requiring lawyers to report their pro bono activities annually when renewing their practicing certificate.1 The changes were in lieu of earlier proposals to impose a mandatory minimum of 16 hours of pro bono per year for lawyers in Singapore. The collection of information about pro bono activity is intended to enable a more comprehensive understanding of the legal aid landscape in the country.2 Recent reforms to the Legal Aid and Advice Act complement these efforts by expanding legal aid coverage, and the government has expressed plans to increase funding for the Law Society’s Criminal Legal Aid Scheme.

Although these changes may not be fully reflected in the data collected for the 2015 Index, a sharp increase in participation from law firms in Singapore suggests these legal reforms may have already begun to influence the perception of pro bono by the legal community. In addition, they are likely to have a significant impact on the levels of pro bono work carried out by Singaporean lawyers in the near future, and continued year-on-year analysis of data submitted to the Index will help to clarify the relationship between such regulations and the development of Singapore’s pro bono landscape.

Twice as many firms with offices in Singapore submitted data for this year’s Index compared to 2014. While all of last year’s participants were international law firms with offices in Singapore, 2015 saw the first Index submission from a domestic Singaporean firm. Data submissions were received from 14 firms detailing their pro bono initiatives in Singapore, and 19 firms provided qualitative information. The resulting analysis showed a drop in the average hours of pro bono per lawyer to 4.2 hours from 8.4 hours in 2014. This shift, however, may simply reflect the broader scope of firms submitting data in 2015.

Data submitted this year detailing the percentage of partners engaged in pro bono indicates an increase in partner engagement. Firms in Singapore reported in 2014 that 16.7 percent of partners had contributed some time to pro bono work over the previous 12 months, whereas 2015 data found an increase of nearly four percentage points to 20.6 percent of partners.

1http://statutes.agc.gov.sg/aol/search/display/view.w3p;page=0;query=CompId%3A9fa6308f-3187-48cb-a395-459244673abe;rec=0
2http://www.todayonline.com/singapore/lawyers-may-have-report-time-spent-pro-bono-work?page=1
Firm Name Average Hours per Fee-Earner Fee Earners with 10+ Hours of Pro Bono
White & Case 20.54 51.43%
Shearman & Sterling LLP 19.09 19.05%
Skadden, Arps, Slate, Meagher & Flom LLP 14.83 16.67%
Simmons & Simmons 8.70 -
Latham & Watkins LLP 8.69 27.78%
DLA Piper 8.50 16.67%
Reed Smith LLP 3.92 8.33%
Freshfields Bruckhaus Deringer LLP 2.78 -
Drew & Napier LLC 1.07 3.56%
Colin Ng & Partners LLP 0.70 2.17%
K & L Gates 0.53 0%
Morrison & Foerster LLP 0.50 0%
Azmi & Associates 0 0%
Dechert 0 0%

South Korea

South Korea’s rapidly expanding culture of pro bono has been driven by the presence of international law firms, many of which have rushed to open offices in South Korea following government efforts to liberalize the legal sector which began in 2007. Law firms have been attracted by the country’s thriving economy and a growing recognition of its significant role as a regional engine of growth. Local proponents of pro bono enjoy strong international support from established organizations globally, which frequently provide resources and training to South Korean law firms and non-profit organizations interested in promoting pro bono. State bar associations require lawyers to fulfil a mandatory minimum of pro bono hours each year, illustrating the legal community’s desire to foster a culture of pro bono in South Korea.1 In addition, South Korean law only guarantees legal representation to individuals who have been sued and are unable to secure legal counsel. This minimal coverage leaves substantial gaps in legal representation, for example in the cases of those who wish to bring civil suits but cannot afford a lawyer.2

Social entrepreneurship is also gaining popularity across the country. The development of a thriving social economy in South Korea has been fostered by the Social Enterprise Promotion Act (2007) and the Basic Law on Cooperatives (2012), two pieces of legislation that have spurred the growth of social enterprises in the country. These changes have increased the demand for pro bono legal services in South Korea as a growing number of social entrepreneurs seek to establish legal entities. The non-profit sector has also grown as social entrepreneurs establish networks and organizations to promote social business. Like the entrepreneurs they support, these groups also serve as a source of increased demand for pro bono legal services in South Korea.3

Data submitted to the 2015 Index shows that the more than 500 lawyers represented by respondent firms in South Korea had the strongest pro bono participation across the Asia and Pacific region, performing on average 62.5 hours over the past 12 months compared to a regional median average of 17.3 hours. As in 2014, four law firms submitted data on their pro bono initiatives. Further analysis suggests that 2015 numbers were boosted dramatically by the participation of one of South Korea’s largest domestic firms for the first time.

Evidence suggests that partner engagement is also on the rise in South Korea. While only one of the four respondent firms in 2014 indicated that their partners engaged in any pro bono work over the previous 12 months, the two firms that submitted partner data in 2015 reported their partners averaged more than 30 hours of pro bono each, far higher than the regional average of 13.4 hours per partner.

1http://www.imakenews.com/probonoinstitute/e_article000685750.cfm?x=b8lsHP7,b5TlybJr
2http://thepbeye.probonoinst.org/2014/10/29/pbis-got-seoul-part-2/
3http://www.forbes.com/sites/meehyoekoo/2013/09/30/social-economy-on-the-rise-in-south-korea-insights-from-ashoka-korea/
Firm Name Average Hours per Fee-Earner Fee Earners with 10+ Hours of Pro Bono
Bae, Kim & Lee LLC 63.17 41.75%
DLA Piper 36.50 50.00%
Paul Hastings 32.13 100.00%
Ropes & Gray LLP 0.00 0.00%
Skadden, Arps, Slate, Meagher & Flom LLP 0 0%

Australia

Australia’s tight knit, collaborative pro bono community is well known as a demonstrated leader in the pro bono sector and data on the pro bono trends and benchmarks in Australia is widely available. The Australian National Pro Bono Resource Centre sets an aspirational target of 35 hours of pro bono per lawyer per year, and publishes its overall findings in its Annual Law Firm Pro Bono Survey1. Data from the Pro Bono Resource Centre’s 2014 survey showed a significant increase in the number of firms signing up to the voluntary target. However, the number of firms that recognise pro bono work as full billable hours has dropped by 10 percent since 2012 and 20 percent since 2010. There was also a drop in the percentage of firms that recognised pro bono in other ways, such as through performance appraisals.

In addition, the Australian government’s attorney general’s department publishes its annual Legal Services Expenditure Report2 with data on pro bono hours per fee-earner for all firms who provide legal services to the government. The 2013-2014 report showed data from 100 firms reported an average of 49.6 hours per fee-earner, a number constant from the previous year.

Eight Australian firms reported to the 2015 Index, double the number that submitted data in 2014. These firms reported an average of 28.9 hours per fee-earner which was down from last year’s average of 49.1 hours but the inputs varied widely from firm to firm. The Index found 36.2 percent of lawyers performed ten or more hours of pro bono, down from 61.6 percent last year. Partner engagement also decreased, although is relatively still high compared to other countries, with 49.4 percent involved in at least one pro bono matter for an average of 12.8 hours per partner compared to 63.2 percent last year when partners averaged 18.4 hours each.

Pro bono infrastructure in Australia remains sophisticated. Most firms, or 85 percent, have pro bono coordinators and over half hold pro bono targets and factor this into compensation.

For a practitioner's view of pro bono in Australia, please see here.

1https://wic041u.server-secure.com/vs155205_secure/CMS/files_cms/4th_National_Law_Firm_Pro_Bono_Survey_2014_Final_Report.pdf
2http://www.ag.gov.au/Publications/Documents/Commonwealth%20Legal%20Services%20Expenditure/LegalServicesExpenditureReport2013-14.pdf
Firm Name Country Average Hours per Fee-Earner Fee Earners with 10+ Hours of Pro Bono
Chamberlains Law Firm Australia 67.57 100.00%
DLA Piper Australia 51.40 42.33%
K & L Gates LLP Australia 29.52 51.41%
Holding Redlich Australia 21.35 41.44%
Banki Haddock Fiora Australia 14.80 64.00%
McInnes Wilson Lawyers Australia 8.50 13.64%
Colin Biggers & Paisley Australia 6.06 7.58%
Skadden, Arps, Slate, Meagher & Flom LLP Australia 0.20 0%

England & Wales

There have been a few significant changes to the legal landscape in England and Wales over the past 12 months. The Law Society and the Solicitors Regulation Authority have continued efforts to open up the legal profession to a wider range of individuals, enabling professionals with legal experience to qualify as lawyers without completing training contracts.1 Initiatives like this are designed to respond to the perceived lack of diversity in the legal profession in England and Wales. Time will tell whether this will have an impact on levels of pro bono engagement as well.

Widely discussed cuts to legal aid in the UK continue to cause concern in the legal fraternity. Law firms have made it clear that they are not in a position to fill this gap, although the reduced support for individuals may result in a change to the way that pro bono assistance is delivered by firms to individuals.2 Partly in response to this an industry-led initiative, the Collaborative Plan for Pro Bono in the UK, has been created to help firms improve access to justice in the UK. This initiative sets an aspirational annual target of 25 hours of pro bono for each fee earner at participating law firms.

A total of 38 firms with offices in England and Wales responded to the Index this year, a sizable increase from the 27 firms that participated in 2014. Of these, 30 provided data relating to the amount of pro bono they have performed and the engagement levels of their lawyers, a similar number to last year. Among the 8,043 lawyers that the data relates to, fee-earners in England and Wales performed an average of 21.9 hours of pro bono each. This was in line with last year’s figure of 21.3 hours.

The percentage of fee-earners that performed 10 or more hours of pro bono has also remained steady from last year, dipping to 35.3 percent from 36.1 percent. This suggests a positive trend in terms of both the amount of pro bono each lawyer is undertaking and the amount of lawyers getting involved in pro bono matters.

Partner engagement showed a positive trend compared to last year. In 2015, 37.8 percent of partners recorded time on pro bono matters compared to 38.1 percent last year but the number of pro bono hours performed by partners increased by almost 10 percent to 14.9 hours. This is a positive sign that partners see pro bono as an increasingly important part of their work.

For a practitioner's view of pro bono in England and Wales, please see here.

1http://www.sra.org.uk/students/resources/equivalent-means-information-pack.page
2http://www.dlapiperprobono.com/blog/pro-bono/2014/a-new-way-forward-in-the-post-legal-aid-era.html
Firm Name Country Average Hours per Fee-Earner Fee Earners with 10+ Hours of Pro Bono
Arnold & Porter LLP England and Wales 79.25 100.00%
Morrison & Foerster LLP England and Wales 63.17 65.85%
Dechert England and Wales 55.09 87.86%
Paul Hastings England and Wales 50.41 89.29%
Skadden, Arps, Slate, Meagher & Flom LLP England and Wales 48.24 59.83%
Faegre Baker Daniels LLP England and Wales 46.80 60.00%
Weil, Gotshal & Manges LLP England and Wales 45.25 64.79%
McDermott Will & Emery LLP England and Wales 39.68 55.00%
Hogan Lovells England and Wales 34.80 46.99%
Debevoise & Plimpton LLP England and Wales 33.33 55.00%
Simmons & Simmons England and Wales 31.20 -
Freshfields Bruckhaus Deringer LLP England and Wales 30.74 -
Orrick, Herrington & Sutcliffe LLP England and Wales 29.08 51.61%
Reed Smith LLP England and Wales 26.81 48.16%
DLA Piper England and Wales 26.13 56.70%
Latham & Watkins LLP England and Wales 25.68 38.13%
Bates Wells Braithwaite England and Wales 17.91 41.54%
K & L Gates LLP England and Wales 13.65 34.69%
White & Case England and Wales 12.38 27.57%
Ropes & Gray LLP England and Wales 11.99 8.60%
Linklaters LLP England and Wales 11.89 14.92%
Ashurst England and Wales 11.47 24.42%
Goodwin Procter LLP England and Wales 9.65 25.00%
Kirkland & Ellis LLP England and Wales 9.64 21.92%
Shearman & Sterling LLP England and Wales 8.96 21.31%
Nabarro LLP England and Wales 6.71 17.14%
Pillsbury Winthrop Shaw Pittman LLP England and Wales 6.58 -
Berwin Leighton Paisner LLP England and Wales 2.73 9.79%
Winston & Strawn LLP England and Wales 1.76 11.76%
Chowdhury & Ullah England and Wales 0 -

Europe

Funding for public services across Europe has been cut due to ongoing austerity measures to try to bring state budgets under control. Legal aid and access to justice initiatives have felt the pinch as well as other services1 which may have an impact on the type of clients looking for pro bono assistance from law firms.

Pro bono has been an increasingly visible sector across Europe in recent years, with growing interest and participation on behalf of lawyers as well as non-government organisations (NGO). Organisations such as PILnet: the Global Network for Public Interest Law have worked hard to promote the practice of pro bono, sharing knowledge and information to help raise standards and impact. With decreasing levels of legal aid throughout the region, this role is ever-more important.2

Across continental Europe, data was received from firms with offices in 26 jurisdictions compared to 29 in 2014 with the vast majority from international firms and networks. Again for the 2015 index, we have separated the data for England and Wales from the rest of Europe due to the high levels of pro bono infrastructure and support for pro bono there compared to the rest of the region.

Among the 7,000 lawyers involved in the data for Europe this year, on average lawyers performed 17.7 hours of pro bono work over the last 12 months, up from an average of 11.8 hours last year. This figure is boosted by submissions from a handful of countries where the average is higher than the regional norm. For example in Iceland, lawyers averaged 55.6 hours of pro bono. And in Ukraine, despite significant social upheaval, lawyers performed an average of 55.5 hours of pro bono.

In Western Europe responses were similar to those from last year and we are watching closely to see if the trend will continue to reflect in coming years a steady increase in the average levels of pro bono performed across Europe.

On average, 29.1 percent of lawyers across the region performed 10 or more hours of pro bono, an increase from last year’s figure of 24.7 percent.

There were high levels of partner engagement across the continent, with a median average of 40.2 percent of partners recording time on pro bono matters across participating countries this year compared to 37.4 percent in 2014. On average partners across Europe recorded a median average of 11.8 hours of pro bono over the year, a positive number, compared to the 8.0 percent reported last year.

For a practitioner's view of pro bono in Germany, please see here.

1http://www.euractiv.com/sections/health-consumers/study-austerity-undermines-fundamental-rights-across-eu-313245 2http://www.legalvoice.org.uk/2014/10/31/the-demand-is-huge-the-need-urgent-and-the-role-of-pro-bono-lawyers-is-critical/

Please note, the regional data tables have been ordered alphabetically.
Firm Name Country Average Hours per Fee-Earner Fee Earners with 10+ Hours of Pro Bono
A&L Goodbody Ireland 9.78 23.38%
Abreu Advogados Portugal 6.06 6.06%
Arnold & Porter LLP Belgium 68.88 87.5%
Ashurst Belgium 19.65 28.57%
Ashurst France 3.18 6.85%
Ashurst Germany 5.81 13.48%
Ashurst Italy 9.60 22.50%
Ashurst Spain 8.78 24.59%
Ashurst UK – Scotland 5.48 30.30%
Debarliev, Dameski & Kelesoska Macedonia 1.07 14.29%
Debevoise & Plimpton LLP France 22.93 40.00%
Debevoise & Plimpton LLP Germany 0.17 0%
Debevoise & Plimpton LLP Russia 4.69 24.00%
Dechert Belgium 20.33 66.67%
Dechert France 35.87 84.13%
Dechert Georgia 32.20 100.00%
Dechert Germany 19.67 63.64%
Dechert Ireland 42.17 66.67%
Dechert Luxembourg 18.45 54.55%
Dechert Russia 73.67 93.33%
Divjak, Topic & Bahtijarevic Law Firm Croatia 2.67 16.67%
DLA Piper Austria 23.18 12.73%
DLA Piper Belgium 53.35 29.51%
DLA Piper Czech Republic 6.32 12.00%
DLA Piper France 26.75 13.75%
DLA Piper Georgia 19.17 33.33%
DLA Piper Germany 4.00 7.89%
DLA Piper Hungary 22.81 21.43%
DLA Piper Italy 4.72 8.78%
DLA Piper Luxembourg 0.82 0%
DLA Piper Netherlands 4.93 14.63%
DLA Piper Russia 35.92 19.57%
DLA Piper Spain 3.99 6.17%
DLA Piper Norway 8.66 15.71%
DLA Piper Poland 33.85 18.46%
DLA Piper Romania 10.25 25.00%
DLA Piper Slovakia 2.50 12.50%
DLA Piper Ukraine 55.53 15.63%
DLA Piper UK – Scotland 13.31 15.49%
Drzewiecki Tomaszek & Partners Poland 1.23 4.62%
Freshfields Bruckhaus Deringer LLP Austria 2.58 -
Freshfields Bruckhaus Deringer LLP Belgium 21.48 -
Freshfields Bruckhaus Deringer LLP France 13.14 -
Freshfields Bruckhaus Deringer LLP Germany 6.51 -
Freshfields Bruckhaus Deringer LLP Italy 7.41 -
Freshfields Bruckhaus Deringer LLP Netherlands 18.61 -
Freshfields Bruckhaus Deringer LLP Russia 1.86 -
Freshfields Bruckhaus Deringer LLP Spain 1.08 -
Herguner Bilgen Ozeke Turkey 8.85 28.57%
K & L Gates LLP Belgium 0.80 0%
K & L Gates LLP France 0.70 0%
K & L Gates LLP Germany 5.43 14.71%
K & L Gates LLP Italy 0 0%
K & L Gates LLP Russia 32.00 37.50%
K & L Gates LLP Poland 21.04 43.40%
Korelskiy Ischuk Astafiev (KIAP), Attorneys at Law Russia 35.71 100.00%
Kirkland & Ellis LLP Germany 7.00 12.12%
Lalive Switzerland 4.45 15.38%
Latham & Watkins LLP Belgium 9.33 19.05%
Latham & Watkins LLP France 50.33 69.62%
Latham & Watkins LLP Germany 53.53 53.55%
Latham & Watkins LLP Italy 36.23 58.97%
Latham & Watkins LLP Russia 111.29 95.24%
Latham & Watkins LLP Spain 36.09 52.17%
Lex Law Offices Iceland 55.56 88.89%
Linklaters LLP Belgium 5.42 12.00%
Linklaters LLP France 4.58 8.00%
Linklaters LLP Italy 3.06 8.82%
Linklaters LLP Spain 2.98 9.09%
Martins Alfaro, Rui Teixeira & Associados Portugal 22.50 100.00%
McDermott Will & Emery LLP Belgium 107.88 87.5%
McDermott Will & Emery LLP France 18.07 25.00%
McDermott Will & Emery LLP Germany 35.75 45.68%
McDermott Will & Emery LLP Italy 17.59 43.24%
Miranda Correia Amendoeira & Associados Portugal 15.04 22.76%
Morrison & Foerster LLP Belgium 2.38 0%
Morrison & Foerster LLP Germany 13.53 36.67%
Orrick, Herrington & Sutcliffe LLP France 25.35 32.61%
Orrick, Herrington & Sutcliffe LLP Germany 15.38 24.56%
Orrick, Herrington & Sutcliffe LLP Italy 3.88 10.34%
Orrick, Herrington & Sutcliffe LLP Russia 22.85 45.45%
Paul Hastings France 37.98 65.00%
Paul Hastings Germany 37.25 66.67%
Paul Hastings Italy 41.70 100.00%
Reed Smith LLP France 20.80 32.61%
Reed Smith LLP Germany 21.45 57.58%
Shearman & Sterling LLP Belgium 25.01 6.25%
Shearman & Sterling LLP France 6.12 5.13%
Shearman & Sterling LLP Germany 7.89 22.58%
Shearman & Sterling LLP Italy 3.92 4.76%
Sheehan & Partners Ireland 0 0%
Simmons & Simmons Belgium 33.48 -
Simmons & Simmons France 10.79 -
Simmons & Simmons Germany 10.15 -
Simmons & Simmons Italy 4.71 -
Simmons & Simmons Netherlands 3.83 -
Simmons & Simmons Spain 4.75 -
Skadden, Arps, Slate, Meagher & Flom LLP Belgium 3.09 11.76%
Skadden, Arps, Slate, Meagher & Flom LLP France 123.11 55.56%
Skadden, Arps, Slate, Meagher & Flom LLP Germany 9.23 16.13%
Skadden, Arps, Slate, Meagher & Flom LLP Russia 41.14 50.00%
Vieira de Almeida & Associados Portugal 35.64 42.33%
Weil, Gotshal & Manges LLP Czech Republic 4.72 13.21%
Weil, Gotshal & Manges LLP France 7.30 5.68%
Weil, Gotshal & Manges LLP Germany 5.40 10.64%
Weil, Gotshal & Manges LLP Hungary 32.33 55.56%
Weil, Gotshal & Manges LLP Poland 33.58 36.62%
White & Case Belgium 36.41 50.00%
White & Case Czech Republic 27.13 50.00%
White & Case France 11.84 25.00%
White & Case Germany 5.22 11.02%
White & Case Hungary 34.41 50.00%
White & Case Italy 3.00 12.50%
White & Case Russia 11.46 23.17%
White & Case Spain 32.45 54.55%
White & Case Finland 13.85 40.00%
White & Case Poland 47.88 60.00%
White & Case Slovakia 29.31 46.15%
White & Case Switzerland 36.00 60.00%
Winston & Strawn LLP France 2.69 11.54%
Winston & Strawn LLP Switzerland 14.00 40.00%
Yüksel Karkın Küçük Attorney Partnership Turkey 0 0%

Belgium

The Belgian Constitution grants all people a right to legal assistance and the differing types of assistance available, to meet varying needs and resources, demonstrates a strong commitment to legal aid by the government.

Lawyers admitted to practise in Belgium (advocaat-stagiairs/avocats stagiaires) have to complete a three year apprenticeship after being admitted that includes participation in pro bono work, either through a legal clinic or assisting with matters brought before the courts. On the Flemish side of the Brussels bar, newly-admitted lawyers are also required to take on at least 15 pro bono cases over three years.1 Given that all junior lawyers must take on pro bono, we look forward to monitoring findings from Belgium to see whether this makes lawyers more responsive to pro bono over time.

For the 2015 Index, 17 firms with offices in Belgium provided data compared to 12 in 2014. All of these were local offices of international networks based in Britain or the United States rather than domestic or Benelux firms. Given that many international firms focus mainly on European Union and competition/anti-trust law from Brussels offices, the data received only reflects the work of a particular sector of the local Belgian legal community.

For the survey 14 firms with offices in Belgium and representing more than 500 lawyers provided information on the amount of pro bono they do and their engagement levels in the country. On average lawyers in Belgium performed 27.1 hours of pro bono over the last 12 months, down from an average of 35 hours last year when the figure was driven up by a few exceptionally high responses. The result, however, again compares favourably with the Europe average of 17.7 hours.

The percentage of lawyers that have performed 10 or more hours of pro bono over the last 12 months is lower than the European regional average at 27.2 percent compared to 29.1 percent and a drop from last year’s national figure of 42.4 percent. Time will tell whether it is the 2014 or 2015 figure that is the anomaly.

The findings relating to partner engagement tally more closely with the regional average. Partners in Belgium performed an average of 10.4 hours of pro bono over the last 12 months compared to a regional average of 11.8 hours. A total of 32.3 percent of partners said they had spent time on pro bono work, again lower than the European average of 40.2 percent. However, the regional average was swayed by a few exceptionally high responses. Again these figures are lower than in 2014, when 63.2 percent of partners in Belgium carried out some pro bono work, and those who did performed on average 15.8 hours each over the previous 12 months.

1http://www.crowell.com/Locations/Brussels/Pro-Bono-System-in-Belgium
Firm Name Average Hours per Fee-Earner Fee Earners with 10+ Hours of Pro Bono
McDermott Will & Emery LLP 107.88 87.5%
Arnold & Porter LLP 68.88 87.5%
Dechert 57.07 92.31%
DLA Piper 53.35 29.51%
White & Case 36.41 50.00%
Simmons & Simmons 33.48 -
Shearman & Sterling LLP 25.01 6.25%
Freshfields Bruckhaus Deringer LLP 21.48 -
Ashurst 19.65 28.57%
Latham & Watkins LLP 9.33 19.05%
Linklaters LLP 5.42 12.00%
Skadden, Arps, Slate, Meagher & Flom LLP 3.09 11.76%
Morrison & Foerster LLP 2.38 0%
K & L Gates LLP 0.80 0%

France

The number of firms with offices in France that took part in the 2015 Index rose to 23 from the 16 that participated in 2014. While all of last year’s submissions were received from international firms or networks, 2015 saw the first contribution from a domestic French law firm. Of this year’s respondents, 17 firms provided information about fee-earner engagement levels. The Index needs to include data from domestic firms to be truly reflective of the legal community in France. The pool of respondent firms, however, has grown markedly since last year. The 1,392 lawyers that comprise the offices at these 17 firms performed an average of 18.4 hours of pro bono, marginally higher than the regional average of 17.7, and over 16 percent higher than the 15.8 hours of pro bono performed on average by lawyers in France in 2014.

The percentage of lawyers that have performed 10 or more hours of pro bono over the last 12 months has held steady over the last 12 months at 25.2 percent compared to 25.8 percent. This is slightly lower than the Europe-wide average of 29.1 percent.

In contrast, the proportion of partners at these firms that recorded time on pro bono matters rose to 34.9 percent from 25 percent a year ago. The average number of pro bono hours performed by these partners has risen slightly to 7.9 hours from 7.5 hours which is steady but a little below the regional average of 11.8.
Firm Name Average Hours per Fee-Earner Fee Earners with 10+ Hours of Pro Bono
Skadden, Arps, Slate, Meagher & Flom LLP 123.11 55.56%
Latham & Watkins LLP 50.33 69.62%
Paul Hastings 37.98 65.00%
Dechert 35.87 84.13%
DLA Piper 26.75 13.75%
Orrick, Herrington & Sutcliffe LLP 25.35 32.61%
Debevoise & Plimpton LLP 22.93 40.00%
Reed Smith LLP 20.80 32.61%
McDermott Will & Emery LLP 18.07 25.00%
Freshfields Bruckhaus Deringer LLP 13.14 -
White & Case 11.84 25.00%
Simmons & Simmons 10.79 -
Weil, Gotshal & Manges LLP 7.30 5.68%
Shearman & Sterling LLP 6.12 5.13%
Linklaters LLP 4.58 8.00%
Ashurst 3.18 6.85%
Winston & Strawn LLP 2.69 11.54%
K & L Gates LLP 0.70 0%

Germany

The legal community in Germany continues to work hard to promote pro bono in a jurisdiction where lawyers have historically been reticent to provide free legal assistance due to previous legislation (reformed in 2008) that heavily restricted the practice. Organisations such as Pro Bono Deutschland have made it their mission to help foster a culture of pro bono and partnered with key stakeholders in national government, private law firms, and proponents in other EU countries to establish best practices and guidelines to help firms incorporate pro bono into existing operations.1

In 2015, the Global Pro Bono Summit, an initiative of the Taproot Foundation and the BMW Foundation, was held in Berlin, helping to ensure pro bono remains a prominent issue within the German legal sector. Programmes that connect pro bono lawyers to non-government organisations (NGO) and social enterprises, like TrustLaw, have seen a huge increase in the number of German lawyers interested in taking on pro bono projects. These developments suggest a growing awareness of pro bono in the country, and, more importantly, a desire by lawyers and firms to engage further with the practice and with established pro bono practitioners across Europe.

This year saw the average hours of pro bono performed per lawyer in Germany rise to 12.6 hours from 11.6 hours in 2014, and this amongst a larger respondent group. The 2015 Index involved 18 firms with offices in the country comprising 1,800 lawyers, demonstrating a nearly 30 percent increase in participation from the 14 firms (representing 1,620 fee earners) that contributed data for the Index last year.

The percentage of lawyers performing 10 or more hours of pro bono over the year increased marginally to 23.8 percent from 23.2 percent, a trend mirrored across Europe. These figures are below the regional average in 2015 of 29.1 percent as they were in 2014. We look forward to seeing whether the efforts to promote pro bono in Germany result in higher levels of engagement.

The percentage of partners that provided pro bono assistance has increased since last year to 38.1 percent from 30.5 percent. But the average number of hours performed by these partners dropped to 9.1 from 11.3.

For a practitioner's view of pro bono in Germany, please see here.

1http://www.pro-bono-deutschland.org/en/
Firm Name Average Hours per Fee-Earner Fee Earners with 10+ Hours of Pro Bono
Latham & Watkins LLP 53.53 53.55%
Paul Hastings 37.25 66.67%
McDermott Will & Emery LLP 35.75 45.68%
Reed Smith LLP 21.45 57.58%
Dechert 19.67 63.64%
Orrick, Herrington & Sutcliffe LLP 15.38 24.56%
Morrison & Foerster LLP 13.53 36.67%
Simmons & Simmons 10.15 -
Skadden, Arps, Slate, Meagher & Flom LLP 9.23 16.13%
Shearman & Sterling LLP 7.89 22.58%
Kirkland & Ellis LLP 7.00 12.12%
Freshfields Bruckhaus Deringer LLP 6.51 -
Ashurst 5.81 13.48%
K & L Gates LLP 5.43 14.71%
Weil, Gotshal & Manges LLP 5.40 10.64%
White & Case 5.22 11.02%
DLA Piper 4.00 7.89%
Debevoise & Plimpton LLP 0.17 0%

Italy

Enthusiasm for pro bono is growing in Italy but a lack of clarity under Italian law is hampering widespread engagement. There have been cases of disciplinary action taken against lawyers who have offered their services pro bono without clear guidance from professional bodies in Italy and there is a risk that this may happen again.1 The fact that Index participation by law firms in Italy has risen 25 percent from 2014 year may be evidence of this growth.

This year 15 firms responded to the Index, 13 of which are local offices of international networks. This represents a positive increase in participation by both domestic and international firms, as only 8 submissions were received from Italy last year. The participation of two domestic firms is a departure from last year, when submissions in Italy were only received from the Italian branches of international firms. Twelve respondent firms provided data on the amount of pro bono they undertook and their levels of engagement.

All respondent firms have pro bono coordinators, but only four in five have a pro bono committee. . Interestingly, only one respondent firm does not take pro bono into account when looking at fee-earner appraisals.

The Index found that the 643 lawyers in the submission group performed an average of 8.9 hours of pro bono over the last 12 months which was largely unchanged from year’s average of 8.7. The findings relating to the proportion of lawyers undertaking 10 or more hours of pro bono has also held steady since last year at 21.0 percent compared to 20.9 percent.

Partners averaged 5.3 hours of pro bono over the last year compared to 4.5 hours in 2014. While interestingly, almost a quarter of partners, or 24.8 percent, spent time on pro bono work. This represents a notable increase from the 14.5 percent reported last year. It is possible that the greater buy-in from senior members of firms will result in greater levels of engagement throughout the whole sector.

1http://www.legance.it/00651/DOCS/6-00651-25.08.2014_ItaliaOggiSette.pdf
Firm Name Average Hours per Fee-Earner Fee Earners with 10+ Hours of Pro Bono
Paul Hastings 41.70 100.00%
Latham & Watkins LLP 36.23 58.97%
McDermott Will & Emery LLP 17.59 43.24%
Ashurst 9.60 22.50%
Freshfields Bruckhaus Deringer LLP 7.41 -
DLA Piper 4.72 8.78%
Simmons & Simmons 4.71 -
Shearman & Sterling LLP 3.92 4.76%
Orrick, Herrington & Sutcliffe LLP 3.88 10.34%
Linklaters LLP 3.06 8.82%
White & Case 3.00 12.50%
K & L Gates LLP 0 0%

Poland

There was limited pro bono activity in Poland before 1989 but since then the efforts of non-government organisations (NGO) and international as well as domestic law firms have helped develop a thriving culture.1 Since Poland’s accession to the European Union in 2004, a number of international firms and networks have opened offices there which have helped to embed an international pro bono culture in the country. In 2013, PILnet hosted the European Pro Bono Forum in Warsaw, an indication of growing enthusiasm for pro bono.

As social entrepreneurship gains prominence, a number of important stakeholders are joining forces to strengthen the existing social enterprise infrastructure. Key players include NGOs, community organizations, universities, and national and regional governments. In 2009, the Polish government acknowledged the role of social business in reducing unemployment and promoting sustainable growth. It has also directed financial assistance from the European Social Fund to support growth in the sector.2 In addition, NGOs and community organizations are partnering to create social business hubs and meeting spaces in Polish towns and cities to facilitate networking and social innovation opportunities for the public.3 Poland’s social enterprise sector shows promising potential for sustained growth, which is likely to result in increased demand for pro bono services as the number of social enterprises in need of legal advice continues to rise.

This year enough submissions have been received from firms with offices in Poland to allow a separate country analysis for the first time. Five firms provided data submissions, of which one is a domestic Polish firm, with some 300 lawyers comprising the data set. Though this represents only a small increase in participation from the four firms that submitted data last year, the first-time participation of a domestic Polish firm certainly contributes to generating a more accurate reflection of pro bono practices in Poland.

Lawyers in Poland averaged 26.9 hours of pro bono over the last 12 months with almost a third of lawyers, or 30.9 percent, performing 10 or more hours of pro bono. Both these figures are above the regional averages of 17.7 hours and 29.1 percent respectively and demonstrate a strong interest in and commitment to pro bono among respondent firms.

Partners in Poland also enjoy high engagement levels, with 31.7 percent recording time on pro bono work and partners averaging 26.4 hours of pro bono per year, which compared favourably to the regional median average of 11.8 hours and represents a significant increase over the country’s 2014 average of 6.4 hours.

1http://www.probonoinst.org/wpps/wp-content/uploads/a-survey-of-pro-bono-practices-and-opportunities-in-71-jurisdiction-2012.pdf
2https://webgate.ec.europa.eu/socialinnovationeurope/sites/default/files/sites/default/files/Social% 20Innovation%20in%20Poland%20%282011%29.pdf
3https://webgate.ec.europa.eu/socialinnovationeurope/sites/default/files/sites/default/files/Andrzej% 20Klimczuk_Poland%20SIE%20Country%20Summary%20ENGLISH.pdf
Firm Name Average Hours per Fee-Earner Fee Earners with 10+ Hours of Pro Bono
White & Case 47.88 60.00%
DLA Piper 33.85 18.46%
Weil, Gotshal & Manges LLP 33.58 36.62%
K & L Gates LLP 21.04 43.40%
Drzewiecki Tomaszek & Partners 1.23 4.62%

Portugal

Five firms with offices in Portugal provided data about their pro bono work for the 2015 Index allowing us to create a national table for the country for the first time. Four of these were domestic or Lusophone firms based in Portugal while an international firm with an office in Portugal also participated. The international firm declined to provide information on the amount of pro bono performed.

The Index found that three of the four domestic firms have a pro bono coordinator and a pro bono committee. Only one of the domestic firms factors pro bono into compensation for its lawyers while three take pro bono into account when looking at lawyers’ appraisals.

In general, the data provided by firms in Portugal was in line with averages across Europe. Over 300 lawyers were represented and they performed an average of 19.3 hours of pro bono each over the past year compared to the regional average of 17.7 hours.

Partners in Portugal performed 7.2 hours of pro bono on average over the past 12 months, below the continental average of 11.8 hours.

Engagement levels were slightly lower than the European average with 25.1 percent of lawyers in Portugal performing 10 or more hours of pro bono compared to a European average of 29.1 percent. Among partners in Portugal, 44.0 percent spent time on pro bono issues compared to a regional average of 40.2 percent.

The Portuguese Constitution guarantees access to law and judicial review for everyone. Furthermore, it prohibits denying access to justice because of a lack of financial means and confirms that everyone has the right to legal information and counsel as well as to legal aid. As a general rule, and similar to a number of other European countries, attorneys are expected to charge an adequate amount for their services and are prohibited from advertising free legal services.1 This lack of clarity may have inhibited the growth of pro bono in Portugal historically although the findings here show that engagement in pro bono is in line with European averages.

1http://www.probonoinst.org/wpps/wp-content/uploads/a-survey-of-pro-bono-practices-and-opportunities-in-71-jurisdiction-2012.pdf
Firm Name Average Hours per Fee-Earner Fee Earners with 10+ Hours of Pro Bono
Vieira de Almeida & Associados 35.64 42.33%
Martins Alfaro, Rui Teixeira & Associados 22.50 100.00%
Miranda Correia Amendoeira & Associados 15.04 22.76%
Abreu Advogados 6.06 6.06%

Russia

For the 2015 Index, 10 law firms from Russia, including one domestic firm, provided data, which was an increase from eight last year. With high average hours of pro bono and a high proportion of lawyers performing 10 or more hours of pro bono, the findings indicate that there is enthusiasm for pro bono amongst lawyers in Russia.

On average, lawyers there performed 26.5 hours of pro bono over the last year, compared to the European average of 17.7 hours. This is also higher than the 11 hours per fee-earner recorded last year, and with the proportion of lawyers performing 10 or more hours of pro bono rising to 40.5 percent from 25.6 percent. These findings are incredibly positive about the growth of pro bono in Russia.

Partner engagement is also higher than last year and higher than regional averages. The 42 partners surveyed performed an average of 41.0 hours of pro bono against a regional average of 11.8 hours, and 45.2 percent of the partners spent time on pro bono matters compared to 30% in 2014.

This increased engagement has taken place in the context of an increasingly difficult operating environment for non-government organisations (NGO) in the country1 coupled with a rapidly weakening rouble due to sanctions imposed by the international community over Russia’s relationship with Ukrainian separatist groups. In spite of this, the high and increased engagement levels in pro bono suggest a commitment to civil society and development clients on behalf of the legal community.

1http://www.hrw.org/news/2015/04/20/russia-government-against-rights-groups
Firm Name Average Hours per Fee-Earner Fee Earners with 10+ Hours of Pro Bono
Latham & Watkins LLP 111.29 95.24%
Dechert 73.67 93.33%
Skadden, Arps, Slate, Meagher & Flom LLP 41.14 50.00%
DLA Piper 35.92 19.57%
Korelskiy Ischuk Astafiev (KIAP), Attorneys at Law 35.71 100.00%
K & L Gates LLP 32.00 37.50%
Orrick, Herrington & Sutcliffe LLP 22.85 45.45%
White & Case 11.46 23.17%
Debevoise & Plimpton LLP 4.69 24.00%
Freshfields Bruckhaus Deringer LLP 1.86 -

Spain

Spain’s ongoing economic struggles continue to hinder growth and prosperity across the country. High rates of unemployment and EU-supported austerity measures have put significant strains on the Spanish economy and the legal sector has not been immune from the effects. The government has cut legal aid funding by €43m over the past four years and many argue that the legal community has borne the overwhelming cost of decreased government expenditures in the sector. In July 2014, 700 lawyers from 83 local bar associations across the country held a demonstration in Madrid against further cuts to the legal aid budget, arguing such austerity measures too often led to lower payments to lawyers which were cut by 5-10 percent in 2013 alone.1

With private law firms less able to take on pro bono work, the academic community has been the strongest champion for promoting pro bono in Spain. Professors and researchers at the Centre for Social Responsibility and Law at the Colegio de Abogados de Madrid have identified key obstacles to expanding pro bono in Spain, including a lack of guidance and knowledge on how to establish a pro bono infrastructure to implement the practice within firms.2 To address this issue, law professor Marisa Méndez has written a guide (Guía para la Implementación y la Gestión del Trabajo Pro Bono)3 to serve as a roadmap for lawyers and firms wishing to engage in the pro bono sector.

Seven firms provided data for the 2015 Index, comprising about 400 lawyers. This was a slight increase from the six firms that submitted data last year. All these firms were local offices of international networks and the lack of information from domestic firms means data for this year’s Index will not be a true reflection of the pro bono sector in Spain.

On average, lawyers performed 6.5 hours of pro bono each over the last 12 months, which is below the regional average of 17.7 hours and down from 7.8 hours last year. The proportion of lawyers at respondent firms providing 10 or more hours of pro bono over the year fell to 16.5 percent from 33.3 percent last year which was below the regional average of 29.1 percent. Given current pressures on the Spanish economy, these drops may be explained by increasing demands on lawyers to dedicate their time to revenue-generating projects rather than pro bono work.

Partners in the country performed an average of 4.3 hours of pro bono compared to 5.6 hours last year, and 24.6 percent of the 57 partners involved in the survey recorded time on pro bono matters against 11.1 percent of the 18 partners represented in the 2014 Index.

1http://www.lawgazette.co.uk/analysis/comment-and-opinion/happy-65th-birthday-legal-aid/5042438.fullarticle
2http://www.probono.cl/2015/03/miembros-de-fundacion-pro-bono-se-reunieron-con-marisa-mendez-autora-de-la-guia-para-la-implementacion-de-trabajo-pro-bono/
3http://crsa.icam.es/docs/Gu%C3%ADa%20para%20la%20implementaci%C3%B3n%20y%20gesti%C3% B3n%20dle%20trabajo%20pro%20bono.pdf
Firm Name Average Hours per Fee-Earner Fee Earners with 10+ Hours of Pro Bono
Latham & Watkins LLP 36.09 52.17%
White & Case 32.45 54.55%
Ashurst 8.78 24.59%
Simmons & Simmons 4.75 -
DLA Piper 3.99 6.17%
Linklaters LLP 2.98 9.09%
Freshfields Bruckhaus Deringer LLP 1.08 -

United States

The 2015 Index received data from 33 firms with offices in the United States, involving almost 22,000 lawyers. This represents a dramatic increase in participation from the 23 firms that submitted data in 2014. Of those firms involved in the 2015 survey, only three were domestic United States firms without offices in other countries.

The United States is well-known as a leading jurisdiction for pro bono, with firms devoting significant and substantial resources to their pro bono practices and with many firms having well-developed and long-standing programmes. The American Lawyer’s coveted A-List1 also takes pro bono into account when assessing which are the stand-out firms in the United States, which is a clear indication that pro bono is taken seriously by firms and the legal sector alike. As with last year, this is highlighted in the data received, with high levels of engagement across the board.

The American Lawyer’s Pro Bono survey also ranked firms on their international pro bono performance as well as domestic for the first time this year, a sign of increasing internationalisation in the pro bono sector.

Law firms continue to make efforts to evolve their practices, for example by integrating new technology platforms into their practices and the legal community supporting pro bono initiatives by requiring pro bono as part of bar license application processes and allowing pro bono hours to count towards Continuing Legal Education (CLE) credit.2

Lawyers in the United States performed an average of 72.8 hours of pro bono over the last 12 months, similar to last year’s average of 75.0 hours. This level of consistency may result from the fact that many of the pro bono practices are so well-established and that pro bono is engrained in the psyche of the legal profession in the country. A total of 71.4 percent of fee-earners performed 10 or more hours of pro bono, a slightly higher figure than last year’s 69.5 percent. Both these figures are significantly above the average across all responses for the Index and higher than any other jurisdiction.3

There was also a high level of engagement from partners in the United States who spent an average of 34.6 hours of pro bono each, and 73.7 percent of partners recorded time on pro bono matters. This compared to an average of 37.8 hours last year, with 61.1 percent of partners spending time on pro bono. Again, these are both world leading averages and, taken with the fee-earning averages, demonstrate very high levels of engagement at all levels across the firms.

For the Index, 36 firms with offices in the United States provided information on the structure of their pro bono practices. Again the findings demonstrate a very high level of sophistication in terms of pro bono amongst the firms in the country. Of these 94 percent have a formal pro bono policy, 92 percent have a pro bono coordinator, 89 percent have a pro bono committee in place, and 86 percent take pro bono work into account when appraising lawyers. It is very easy to draw parallels between the high engagement levels and the resources that have been put in place to support pro bono at the respondent firms.

For a practitioner's view of pro bono in the United States, please see here.

1http://www.americanlawyer.com/id=1202498700231/The-2014-AList-20-StandOut-Firms
2http://www.americanbar.org/content/dam/aba/administrative/probono_public_service/ls_pb_year_review_ 2014-15.authcheckdam.pdf
3Some other jurisdictions did have slightly higher figures, though all of these had ten or fewer lawyers at respondent firms in the jurisdiction.
Firm Name Country Average Hours per Fee-Earner Fee Earners with 10+ Hours of Pro Bono
Arnold & Porter LLP United States 136.34 98.32%
Debevoise & Plimpton LLP United States 118.74 65.16%
Morrison & Foerster LLP United States 113.36 67.63%
Paul Hastings United States 104.23 98.12%
Dechert United States 98.33 96.28%
Ropes & Gray LLP United States 97.70 83.30%
Orrick, Herrington & Sutcliffe LLP United States 95.29 93.01%
Goodwin Procter LLP United States 88.45 61.34%
Steptoe & Johnson United States 84.76 80.68%
Kirkland & Ellis LLP United States 82.01 78.92%
Latham & Watkins LLP United States 79.15 72.23%
Skadden, Arps, Slate, Meagher & Flom LLP United States 77.71 61.81%
DLA Piper United States 76.21 84.48%
Hogan Lovells United States 74.21 87.19%
McDermott Will & Emery LLP United States 73.50 67.68%
Weil, Gotshal & Manges LLP United States 72.34 61.99%
White & Case United States 70.30 73.60%
Freshfields Bruckhaus Deringer LLP United States 62.37 -
Winston & Strawn LLP United States 57.75 78.01%
Nixon Peabody LLP United States 55.12 68.64%
Shearman & Sterling LLP United States 52.57 81.01%
Reed Smith LLP United States 51.05 59.10%
Fish & Richardson P.C. United States 49.58 50.72%
Faegre Baker Daniels LLP United States 49.55 71.43%
Holland & Knight LLP United States 49.39 -
Dickstein Shapiro LLP United States 48.02 51.50%
Cadwalader Wickersham & Taft LLP United States 41.44 35.58%
Pillsbury Winthrop Shaw Pittman LLP United States 36.84 -
Linklaters LLP United States 36.75 48.85%
K & L Gates LLP United States 35.93 41.51%
Katherine K. Loanzon United States 30.00 100.00%
Osler, Hoskin & Harcourt LLP United States 23.05 22.73%
Sean Morrison, PLLC United States 9.50 0%
Ashurst United States 1.00 2.70%